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Elora Women’s Film Society Annual Film Festival

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Sweet Dreams

Ingoma Nshya is Rwanda’s first and only all women’s drumming troupe. Made up of women from both sides of the 1994 Rwandan genocide, the troupe offers a place of support, healing and reconciliation. When the group decides to partner with two young American entrepreneurs to open Rwanda’s first ever ice cream shop, these remarkable women embark on a journey of independence, peace and possibility. Sweet Dreams interweaves intimate, sometimes heart-wrenching stories, with joyous and powerful music to present a moving portrait of a country in transition.  2012 | 1 h 29 min   Lisa Fruchtman & Rob Fruchtman

The Company of Strangers

In this feature film, 8 elderly women find themselves stranded when their bus breaks down in the wilderness. With only their wits, memories and some roasted frogs’ legs to sustain them, this remarkable group of strangers share their life stories and turn a potential crisis into a magical time of humour, spirit and camaraderie. Featuring non-professional actors and unscripted dialogue, this film dissolves the barrier between fiction and reality, weaving a heart-warming tale of friendship and courage.   1990 | 1 h 41 min   Cynthia Scott

Alberta Nye – Filmmaker

Alberta Nye has always been interested in photography and film.  Going to movies throughout her life led her to buying a cinema in 1991 on Salt Spring Island in British Columbia with her two sisters. Alberta was the projectionist and viewed each movie several times which  intensified her interest in the art of film.  In 1994 the sisters won ‘Best Promotion for a Canadian Film – English’ at the Show Canada National Conference.

From 1993 to 2000 she operated a small movie theatre on the Island of Lanai in Hawaii where she was not only the projectionist, but performed all of the duties associated with the theatre including cleaning up after the movies.

While in Hawaii Alberta was commissioned to create a calendar using her photographs of locals, which was a great success on the island. Some of her photos were used in a Maui newspaper’s special section on Lanai.

In 1998 after training at Maui Community College, Alberta, along with a friend Pineniece Joshua, made a 22 minute documentary titled One God, Many Faces which showed on Hawaii’s Akaku TV several times.

When she was 22 she died while giving birth to her first daughter. After this near death experience, she had no fear of death.

Following the death of her ex-husband in 2007, Alberta was inspired to create a documentary on dying called Smiling at Death: A Closer Look at Dying which premiered to a sell out crowd on Jan. 12, 2014 at the Bookshelf Cinema, Guelph, On, Canada.

Alberta originally intended that Margaret Hackman’s story be included in Smiling at Death: A Closer Look at Dying but she soon realized that Margaret’s story was a documentary unto itself which resulted in So I’m Dying . . . now what?

Alberta is now hard at work on her third film: Signs of Life. She is documenting stories of people who received signs from loved ones after they passed, to let them know they are still around.

http://spiritvalleypictures.com/spiritvalleypictures/Alberta_Nye.html

Films in honor of the National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women, Dec. 4 2016

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20103_01_xlOn December 6, 1989, a gunman entered the engineering building at the University of Montreal and killed fourteen women. This forceful, moving documentary situates this extraordinary crime within the context of other kinds of violence against women. A wounded survivor and other students describe the harrowing event, widely understood as a backlash against feminism. Activists and journalists explain its impact, linking the massacre with cases of rape, sexual harassment and torture worldwide. This lucid, thought-provoking tape is indispensable for organizations dealing with violence against women, as well as for women’s studies classes.

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1990 After the Montreal MassacreGerry Rogers, Director (Documentary, NFB/CBC) 29 mins.

 

 

 


b1b82b1d27d99394b22499cf9397cc33Feminism has shaped the society we live in. But just how far has it brought us, and how relevant is it today? This feature documentary zeroes in on key concerns such as violence against women, access to abortion, and universal childcare, asking how much progress we have truly made on these issues. Rich with archival material and startling contemporary stories, Status Quo? uncovers answers that are provocative and at times shocking.2014

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Status Quo? The unfinished business of feminism in Canada — Karen Cho, Director (Documentary, NFB) 89 mins.

 

 

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October 23, 2016: Films in honor of Women’s History Month

October 23, 2016

Films in honor of Women’s History Month 1pm Elora Public Library

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The Burning Times

NFB, Donna Read, Director.

1990, 56min

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This documentary takes an in-depth look at the witch hunts that swept Europe just a few hundred years ago. False accusations and trials led to massive torture and burnings at the stake and ultimately to the destruction of an organic way of life. The film questions whether the widespread violence against women and the neglect of our environment today can be traced back to those times.


Women on the March

NFB, Douglas Tunstell, Director

Women on the March

This feature film in two parts is an exploration of the women’s suffrage movement. Spearheaded by women like Emmeline Pankhurst, founder of the Women’s Social and Political Union, the Suffragettes realized they would have to become radical and militant if the movement was going to be effective. There followed many demonstrations, and imprisonments until the women’s vote was finally granted, in 1918 (Britain) and 1919 (Canada, except Quebec.)

 

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Alberta Nye-Filmmaker

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Alberta Nye has always been interested in photography and film.  Going to movies throughout her life led her to buying a cinema in 1991 on Salt Spring Island in British Columbia with her two sisters. Alberta was the projectionist and viewed each movie several times which  intensified her interest in the art of film.  In 1994 the sisters won ‘Best Promotion for a Canadian Film – English’ at the Show Canada National Conference.

From 1993 to 2000 she operated a small movie theatre on the Island of Lanai in Hawaii where she was not only the projectionist, but performed all of the duties associated with the theatre including cleaning up after the movies.

While in Hawaii Alberta was commissioned to create a calendar using her photographs of locals, which was a great success on the island. Some of her photos were used in a Maui newspaper’s special section on Lanai.

In 1998 after training at Maui Community College, Alberta, along with a friend Pineniece Joshua, made a 22 minute documentary titled One God, Many Faces which showed on Hawaii’s Akaku TV several times.

When she was 22 she died while giving birth to her first daughter. After this near death experience, she had no fear of death.

Following the death of her ex-husband in 2007, Alberta was inspired to create a documentary on dying called Smiling at Death: A Closer Look at Dying which premiered to a sell out crowd on Jan. 12, 2014 at the Bookshelf Cinema, Guelph, On, Canada.

Alberta originally intended that Margaret Hackman’s story be included in Smiling at Death: A Closer Look at Dying but she soon realized that Margaret’s story was a documentary unto itself which resulted in So I’m Dying . . . now what?

Alberta is now hard at work on her third film: Signs of Life. She is documenting stories of people who received signs from loved ones after they passed, to let them know they are still around.

http://spiritvalleypictures.com/spiritvalleypictures/Alberta_Nye.html

Sweet Dreams

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Ingoma Nshya is Rwanda’s first and only all women’s drumming troupe. Made up of women from both sides of the 1994 Rwandan genocide, the troupe offers a place of support, healing and reconciliation. When the group decides to partner with two young American entrepreneurs to open Rwanda’s first ever ice cream shop, these remarkable women embark on a journey of independence, peace and possibility. Sweet Dreams interweaves intimate, sometimes heart-wrenching stories, with joyous and powerful music to present a moving portrait of a country in transition.  2012 | 1 h 29 min   Lisa Fruchtman & Rob Fruchtman

The Company of Strangers

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In this feature film, 8 elderly women find themselves stranded when their bus breaks down in the wilderness. With only their wits, memories and some roasted frogs’ legs to sustain them, this remarkable group of strangers share their life stories and turn a potential crisis into a magical time of humour, spirit and camaraderie. Featuring non-professional actors and unscripted dialogue, this film dissolves the barrier between fiction and reality, weaving a heart-warming tale of friendship and courage.   1990 | 1 h 41 min   Cynthia Scott

The Gorge Cinema

Our April 23 2017 venue is the Elora Gorge Cinema  43 Mill St. W. Elora
The Gorge Cinema, now celebrating its 40th year, is the longest continuously running repertory cinema in Canada. Nestled in the heart of downtown Elora, in the former historic 1860s Commercial Hotel, the cinema offers state of the art digital projection and Dolby surround sound in a combination of cutting edge presentation within a heritage setting. The Gorge offers a full schedule of films throughout the year ranging from Hollywood blockbusters and award-winning foreign films, to the world’s best documentaries to Canadian features and the occasional indie title. The cinema is also available for rental by school groups and other organizations and is often an ideal venue for lectures and fundraisers.
In short, The Gorge Cinema is a mainstay in the cultural life of Elora, and one that attracts people to settle in the village. It confounds the decades old trend of small-town cinema closings, through excellent film programming, top notch service and now, state-of-the-art film presentation.
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Gerry Rogers, Filmmaker

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Gerry Rogers, Filmmaker.

Gerry Rogers — Director / Producer

Internationally acclaimed documentary filmmaker Gerry Rogers loves, loves making movies! She has over 20 films to her credit and as many awards. Her latest films My Left Breast, an intimate, starkly honest and surprisingly humorous portrayal of her struggle with breast cancer won over 20 international awards including 2 Geminis and Gold at Hot Docs

Pleasant Street, a curious and intimate story of community, love and living with dying, won the Rex Tasker NFB Award for Best Documentary and the Empire Theatre Award for Best Direction. It also won a special jury prize at the Nickel Independent Film Festival. Rogers released her latest film Ferron: girl on a road, a tribute to lesbian singer/songwriter icon Ferron in 2009.

Gerry’s film career began in 1982 at the National Film Board’s Studio D in Montreal. In 1992 she returned to her native Newfoundland and founded Augusta Productions. Her directorial credits include the NFB/CBC co-production After The Montreal Massacre, the internationally award winning Vienna Tribunal and Kathleen Shannon: on film, feminism, and other dreams. Among the many films she has produced is the internationally award winning To a Safer Place. Gerry’s most recent films include, “R” Rated, a 3 minute comedy starring Andy Jones and Ferron: girl on a road, a film on folksinger/songwriter icon Ferron.

Rogers is currently in post production on From Her Majesty’s Pen, shot in Canada’s oldest men’s penitentiary and in development with, Women on the Edge, an alternative drama with female prisoners.


Internationally acclaimed documentary filmmaker and activist Gerry Rogers was born in Corner Brook.

After completing a BSW at MUN she worked with the St. John’s Status of Women Council where she helped found the first Transition House for women and children victims of domestic violence.

Gerry’s film career began in 1982 at the National Film Board’s Studio D in Montreal where she was Program Producer of the Federal Women’s Film Program, a film production, distribution and training program for women filmmakers. In 1992 she returned to Newfoundland and founded Augusta Productions.

Gerry has more than 20 films to her credit and over 40 international awards. Among these are the multi-award winning film “My Left Breast” (for which she won two Geminis) and the films “Pleasant Street,” “FERRON: girl on a road” and “After the Montreal Massacre.” Rogers is currently in post-production on “From Her Majesty’s Pen,” shot in Canada’s oldest men’s penitentiary.

Gerry travels extensively giving lectures and workshops on documentary filmmaking, status of women, and human rights issues. She has been featured in numerous papers and magazines, “The Rosie O’Donnell Show,” “The Vicki Gabereau Show,” on CBC Radio with Shelagh Rogers, among others.

Gerry is also known for her health advocacy, especially her leadership role in drawing public attention to the need for the Cameron Inquiry on the botched ER/PR pathology tests for women with breast cancer in Newfoundland and Labrador.

Gerry lives in St. John’s with her partner, businesswoman Peg Norman.  Canadian Film Centre Biography


Gerry Rogers is a Canadian documentary filmmaker and politician. She began her career with the National Film Board, and left in 1992 to form her own production company, Augusta Productions. Her best-known film, My Left Breast, documented her battle with breast cancer and was released in 2000.

Openly lesbian, Rogers is the partner of social worker and politician Peg Norman.[1]

Rogers was elected to the Newfoundland and Labrador House of Assembly in the 2011 provincial election, representing the district of St. John’s Centre as a member of the Newfoundland and Labrador New Democratic Party.[2] She is the first openly gay politician ever elected to the provincial legislature.[3]

In honour of her role as a significant builder of LGBT culture and history in Canada, a portrait of Rogers by artist Claire Priddle was added to the Canadian Lesbian and Gay Archives‘ National Portrait Collection in 2003.[4]

Wikipedia


 

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