April 19 2018 Women’s Artist Series: Girl from God’s Country

 

Elora Women's Film Society April 19 2018

This is a documentary about Nell Shipman, the first female independent film maker to pioneer the nude scene. She was also a pioneer animal advocate. In 1921, Shipman refused a contract with Sam Goldfish (later known as Sam Goldwyn) and moved to the Idaho wilderness with a zoo of 70 wild animals to write, direct, produce and act in movies portraying women as self-reliant heroines who rescued their male leads. Shipman performed her own stunts and developed an uncanny rapport with her animal actors. The film reveals the forgotten legacy of Shipman and a generation of female silent film pioneers. The documentary includes rare footage of these artists, including minority filmmakers, Zora Neale Hurston and Miriam Wong. Geena Davis and women directors discuss gender-inequities Nell and her counterparts faced that perpetuate in today’s film industry.

Elora Women’s Film Society Annual Film Festival

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Sweet Dreams

Ingoma Nshya is Rwanda’s first and only all women’s drumming troupe. Made up of women from both sides of the 1994 Rwandan genocide, the troupe offers a place of support, healing and reconciliation. When the group decides to partner with two young American entrepreneurs to open Rwanda’s first ever ice cream shop, these remarkable women embark on a journey of independence, peace and possibility. Sweet Dreams interweaves intimate, sometimes heart-wrenching stories, with joyous and powerful music to present a moving portrait of a country in transition.  2012 | 1 h 29 min   Lisa Fruchtman & Rob Fruchtman

The Company of Strangers

In this feature film, 8 elderly women find themselves stranded when their bus breaks down in the wilderness. With only their wits, memories and some roasted frogs’ legs to sustain them, this remarkable group of strangers share their life stories and turn a potential crisis into a magical time of humour, spirit and camaraderie. Featuring non-professional actors and unscripted dialogue, this film dissolves the barrier between fiction and reality, weaving a heart-warming tale of friendship and courage.   1990 | 1 h 41 min   Cynthia Scott

Alberta Nye – Filmmaker

Alberta Nye has always been interested in photography and film.  Going to movies throughout her life led her to buying a cinema in 1991 on Salt Spring Island in British Columbia with her two sisters. Alberta was the projectionist and viewed each movie several times which  intensified her interest in the art of film.  In 1994 the sisters won ‘Best Promotion for a Canadian Film – English’ at the Show Canada National Conference.

From 1993 to 2000 she operated a small movie theatre on the Island of Lanai in Hawaii where she was not only the projectionist, but performed all of the duties associated with the theatre including cleaning up after the movies.

While in Hawaii Alberta was commissioned to create a calendar using her photographs of locals, which was a great success on the island. Some of her photos were used in a Maui newspaper’s special section on Lanai.

In 1998 after training at Maui Community College, Alberta, along with a friend Pineniece Joshua, made a 22 minute documentary titled One God, Many Faces which showed on Hawaii’s Akaku TV several times.

When she was 22 she died while giving birth to her first daughter. After this near death experience, she had no fear of death.

Following the death of her ex-husband in 2007, Alberta was inspired to create a documentary on dying called Smiling at Death: A Closer Look at Dying which premiered to a sell out crowd on Jan. 12, 2014 at the Bookshelf Cinema, Guelph, On, Canada.

Alberta originally intended that Margaret Hackman’s story be included in Smiling at Death: A Closer Look at Dying but she soon realized that Margaret’s story was a documentary unto itself which resulted in So I’m Dying . . . now what?

Alberta is now hard at work on her third film: Signs of Life. She is documenting stories of people who received signs from loved ones after they passed, to let them know they are still around.

http://spiritvalleypictures.com/spiritvalleypictures/Alberta_Nye.html

Alberta Nye-Filmmaker

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Alberta Nye has always been interested in photography and film.  Going to movies throughout her life led her to buying a cinema in 1991 on Salt Spring Island in British Columbia with her two sisters. Alberta was the projectionist and viewed each movie several times which  intensified her interest in the art of film.  In 1994 the sisters won ‘Best Promotion for a Canadian Film – English’ at the Show Canada National Conference.

From 1993 to 2000 she operated a small movie theatre on the Island of Lanai in Hawaii where she was not only the projectionist, but performed all of the duties associated with the theatre including cleaning up after the movies.

While in Hawaii Alberta was commissioned to create a calendar using her photographs of locals, which was a great success on the island. Some of her photos were used in a Maui newspaper’s special section on Lanai.

In 1998 after training at Maui Community College, Alberta, along with a friend Pineniece Joshua, made a 22 minute documentary titled One God, Many Faces which showed on Hawaii’s Akaku TV several times.

When she was 22 she died while giving birth to her first daughter. After this near death experience, she had no fear of death.

Following the death of her ex-husband in 2007, Alberta was inspired to create a documentary on dying called Smiling at Death: A Closer Look at Dying which premiered to a sell out crowd on Jan. 12, 2014 at the Bookshelf Cinema, Guelph, On, Canada.

Alberta originally intended that Margaret Hackman’s story be included in Smiling at Death: A Closer Look at Dying but she soon realized that Margaret’s story was a documentary unto itself which resulted in So I’m Dying . . . now what?

Alberta is now hard at work on her third film: Signs of Life. She is documenting stories of people who received signs from loved ones after they passed, to let them know they are still around.

http://spiritvalleypictures.com/spiritvalleypictures/Alberta_Nye.html

Sweet Dreams

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Ingoma Nshya is Rwanda’s first and only all women’s drumming troupe. Made up of women from both sides of the 1994 Rwandan genocide, the troupe offers a place of support, healing and reconciliation. When the group decides to partner with two young American entrepreneurs to open Rwanda’s first ever ice cream shop, these remarkable women embark on a journey of independence, peace and possibility. Sweet Dreams interweaves intimate, sometimes heart-wrenching stories, with joyous and powerful music to present a moving portrait of a country in transition.  2012 | 1 h 29 min   Lisa Fruchtman & Rob Fruchtman

Films in honor of the National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women, Dec. 4 2016

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20103_01_xlOn December 6, 1989, a gunman entered the engineering building at the University of Montreal and killed fourteen women. This forceful, moving documentary situates this extraordinary crime within the context of other kinds of violence against women. A wounded survivor and other students describe the harrowing event, widely understood as a backlash against feminism. Activists and journalists explain its impact, linking the massacre with cases of rape, sexual harassment and torture worldwide. This lucid, thought-provoking tape is indispensable for organizations dealing with violence against women, as well as for women’s studies classes.

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1990 After the Montreal MassacreGerry Rogers, Director (Documentary, NFB/CBC) 29 mins.

 

 

 


b1b82b1d27d99394b22499cf9397cc33Feminism has shaped the society we live in. But just how far has it brought us, and how relevant is it today? This feature documentary zeroes in on key concerns such as violence against women, access to abortion, and universal childcare, asking how much progress we have truly made on these issues. Rich with archival material and startling contemporary stories, Status Quo? uncovers answers that are provocative and at times shocking.2014

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Status Quo? The unfinished business of feminism in Canada — Karen Cho, Director (Documentary, NFB) 89 mins.

 

 

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Status Quo? The Unfinished Business of Feminism in Canada

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Feminism has shaped the society we live in. But just how far has it brought us, and how relevant is it today? This feature documentary zeroes in on key concerns such as violence against women, access to abortion, and universal childcare, asking how much progress we have truly made on these issues. Rich with archival material and startling contemporary stories, Status Quo? uncovers answers that are provocative and at times shocking.

2014 Status Quo? The Unfinished Business of Feminism in Canada– Karen Cho, Director (Documentary, NFB) 87min.

 

 

After the Montreal Massacre, 1990

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After the Montreal Massacre, 1990, 27 min 14 s

 

December 6, 1989. Sylvie Gagnon was attending her last day of classes at Ecole Polytechnique, an engineering school in Montreal, when Marc Lepine entered the building. Systematically separating the women from the men, he opened fire on women students, yelling “you’re all a bunch of feminists.” Sylvie survived a bullet wound to the head while fourteen other women were murdered.

After the Montreal Massacre is a useful tool for helping us come to terms with these murders and how they relate to the larger picture of male violence against women. Women throughout Canada and the world are expressing a growing concern about the widespread violence and mounting fear in their daily lives. The haunting images taken on the day of the massacre and in the days following, set the stage for an exploration of the urgent issues of misogyny, male violence and sexism.

Testimony from Sylvie Gagnon about what the massacre means to her, conversations with a group of college students, and interviews with noted writers, feminist activists, and leaders of organizations for women, contribute to this moving and important documentary which provides a challenge for change in our political, social and personal lives.

1990 After the Montreal Massacre — Gerry Rogers, Director (Documentary, NFB/CBC) 27min.

 

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